Category Archives: street dogs

3 ways to spay a dog

3 ways to ‘spay’ a dog

In North America, veterinarians are generally trained to remove the uterus and ovaries (spay) whereas in Europe, the removal of the ovaries (and sparing the uterus) is often the norm.

Some advocate to spare the ovaries for health reasons (and remove only the uterus) which means females will go through heat cycles, attract males and chaos, but be infertile.

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Since chaos around females in heat is often a public safety issue and dog welfare problem, not removing the ovaries seems inappropriate for a successful dog population management program.

But why not just remove the ovaries and leave the uterus behind (ovariectomy, not ovariohysterectomy) which means a less invasive surgery for the free-roaming females?

Chemical castration of dogs – helpful?

Chemical castration of dogs – helpful?

The answer may be found in a study done on a statistically significant number of dogs in Chile.

It concluded the majority of dogs displayed no long-term (up to 6 months) testosterone levels change after chemical sterilization.

Does castration help reduce roaming?

The implications? We need to better understand the role testosterone plays on sexual, aggressive and
roaming behaviours to appropriately chose the best method of sterilization and intended impact on male dogs beyond shooting blanks.

Our team does not believe, at this point, that chemical sterilization is an ideal choice for free-roaming rez dogs: if a chemically castrated dog continues to pursue females in heat and engage in dog aggression, it remains a public safety issue.

Your thoughts?

Dr. Judith Samson-French

Effects of surgical and chemical sterilization on the behavior of free-roaming male dogs in Puerto Natales, Chile.
Garde E1, Pérez GE2, Vanderstichel R3, Dalla Villa PF4, Serpell JA5.

 

Working together

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Communities throughout the world can clearly benefit from a little help managing runaway dog populations. To exponentially accelerate results why not consider the following 3 points:

1. Permanently and individually identify the dogs handled.
2. Leave a record of activities performed with the community.
3. Work with communities that have a strong dog champion.

This way, unrelated groups working in a community over time can assure some continuity and avoid spaying a dog already spayed.

3 solutions – which are you using?

When assisting communities to humanely deal with unwanted dogs, there are 3 possible immediate solutions:
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1. Stop or decrease “littering”
This starts with the prevention of as many pregnancies (ie targeting females) as possible, as fast as possible, with surgical and/or non-surgical intervention and conventional means (sequestration of females in heat).
 
2. Prevent influx of dogs in the communities.
Especially non sexually neutralized dogs (spayed or neutered).
 
3. Encourage adoption of excess dogs within and outside the communities.
For a dog population management plan to sustainably succeed in the long term, more than one solution needs to be applied. This also implies that each community needs to implement a set of bylaws suitable and enforceable to their specific needs.
Respectfully,
Dr. Judith Samson-French

1 mother has 8 competitors

When dealing with free-roaming dogs, it is heartbreaking to see a lactating female hiding away from her weaning aged pups.

The pups, unable to find food and water, try to get milk from an exhausted mother who has given her best to keep them alive.

So why is their mom now hiding from them? Because their dirty long nails are starting to inflame her sagging mammary glands, ie she is getting mastitis and it plainly hurts.

A mom with her pups, now competitors

However the worse is not over, the fight for survival is only starting for all of them: the 8 hungry pups directly compete with their debilitated mother for food.

So every free-roaming female who is sexually neutralized is spared misery within the next 10 months (reason #3), so why not target females first and foremost in managing a population of unwanted dogs ?

Dr. Judith Samson-French

1 female, 1 year, 44 pups

To reduce the number of free-roaming dogs, there is only ONE way to get there fast: target all females first for sexual neutralization.

fearful pups

Here’s is an example:

A female has a litter of 8 pups, half of which are females.

A year later, her 4 female pups will have been bred, likely by their brothers, father or uncles, to each produce another 8 pups. Add to those 32 dogs,  the mom’s second litter of 8 pups and her previous litter’s 4 males,  and we now have a total of 44 unwanted free-roaming, under-socialized fearful dogs running around.

Of course, there will be mortality but still..

1 female left intact has the potential to produce 44 offsprings within a year, many of which will be  inbred and living a life not worth living.

Target ALL FEMALES first, if not why not?

Dr. Judith Samson-French

 

 

Local dog champion – priceless!

There is no doubt in my mind, the best predictor of success for a sustainable humane dog population management (DPM) project is the presence of a dog champion in the local community receiving the project.

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A local dog champion is a person who lives in the community or has frequent significant contacts with it, has taken to heart the welfare of dogs with and without names/homes, has the support and trust of the community, and has knowledge of the culture and language.

A DPM project, whether on First Nations land (rez dogs) or abroad (street dogs), needs to seek such collaboration to accelerate success and transfer the means (financial, technical, scientific and educational) for a community to become self-sustained in their effort to humanely control their unwanted dogs population.

Do you have a reliable local dog champion? If so, congratulations, you have the first ingredient to success for your project!

Dr. Judith Samson-French