Tag Archives: DWNN

Working together

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Communities throughout the world can clearly benefit from a little help managing runaway dog populations. To exponentially accelerate results why not consider the following 3 points:

1. Permanently and individually identify the dogs handled.
2. Leave a record of activities performed with the community.
3. Work with communities that have a strong dog champion.

This way, unrelated groups working in a community over time can assure some continuity and avoid spaying a dog already spayed.

How many stray dogs in the world?

How many stray dogs in the world?

Apparently the answer could be as high as 600,000,000 but we don’t care and here’s why: that number is incomprehensibly too large.

We can reason this situation is intolerable. We are morally aware we have an obligation to help, yet we remain strangely unmoved because this number is much too large to connect with. Even beyond empathy.

So let’s look at the numbers closer to home.

In 2013, nearly 4 millions pets were euthanized in the USA, 2.7 millions of which are healthy or with easily treatable issues. During that time, over 300,000 dogs were imported from developing countries. Incomprehensible!

Let’s look at our own numbers, in Canada.

Numbers are difficult to come by in Canada due to the lack of governing agencies and standards. Canada is the wild west of rescues and pet imports. The best estimates report over 600,000 dogs are euthanized every year, most of which are in Quebec.

This translates to likely well over 1,000,000 dogs needing a name and a home in Canada.

How can we sanely live in a country where so many dogs are homeless and gas chambers are still in use?

How can we participate in worldwide efforts to help others manage their populations of unwanted dogs when our own house is not in order?

It is time we focus on making social changes in Canada that prove successful. Only once we have humanely dealt with our surplus dog problems will we be in a position to efficiently help others.

Dr. Judith Samson-French

Too many dogs – why?

Overpopulation of dogs happens for two main reasons when vet services are neither available nor affordable :

  1. Dogs are allowed to reproduce with little chance to find homes for their offsprings.
  1. Dogs are relinquished/abandoned by their owners who can or will no longer keep them.
Owned and roaming - doing well.
Owned and roaming – doing well.

It is that simple to define the problem.

The solution is more complex and will vary with cultural background. The dogs themselves can’t solve the problem.

It’s about seeking a balance between physically limiting breeding through sterilization (surgical or not), sequestering females in heat, and tying/fencing dogs and social or attitudinal changes about our relationship with dogs who are now entirely unemployed.

When there is limited access to education for people and training for dogs, the problem magnifies quickly.